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Talbot, L.T. – Why Four Gospels? The Four-Fold Portrait of Christ

Why Four Gospels? The Four-Fold Portrait of Christ in Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John
A Series of Radio Messages

By Louis T. Talbot
Pastor, The Church of the Open Door
President, The Bible Institute of Los Angeles Los Angeles, California

In this 22 chapter work by Talbot (BIOLA), he looks at the four gospels. He sees the differences between them, identifying each one’s particular audience and character.

Copyright © 1944

“Buy the truth, and sell it not; also wisdom, and instruction, and understanding” (Pro 23:23)





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Taylor Objections to Street Preaching Considered

Objections to Street Preaching Considered

By William Taylor

William Taylor was a Methodist in the California Conference in the mid-1800’s. Although published in 1867, this article speaks to our generation. Mr. Taylor spoke about cultural refinement, secular education, the negative effects of immigration, the apathy of the churches, and other topics that apply today. The book from which this chapter is taken is called, “Seven Years’ Street Preaching in San Francisco, California.”



Objections to Street Preaching Considered

Summary: In this 8 chapter work (very short chapters, so this is almost a tract)by Taylor (Methodist), he examines objections to street preaching. He looks at 8 objections: a degradation of ministerial dignity, it debases (makes common) the gospel, it detracts from regular ministrations, it creates riots and confusion, it brings confrontation with civil authorities, it is impossible to preach both in the church and in the street, and it will damage the preachers voice (bronchitis and crack his voice). Continue reading

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The Open English Bible [OEBus]

The Open English Bible [OEBus]

Summary of The Open English Bible [OEBus]

The Open English Bible (OEB) is a freely redistributable modern translation based on the Twentieth Century New Testament translation. A work in progress, with its first publication in August 2010, the OEB is edited and distributed by Russell Allen.




The OEB is a modern translation created by editing the Twentieth Century New Testament translation, and derived from the Greek Wescott-Hort text. The OEB aims to be a “scholarly defensible mainstream translation”, which is intended “not to push any particular theological line”. The reading level of the OEB “[corresponds] roughly to the NEB/REB or NRSV”, that is, High School reading level. The OEB’s initial release was in August 2010, although a preview of the Book of Mark was released in March 2010. (taken from Wikipedia.org)

The Open English Bible [OEBus]

Tyndale Bible of 1534 [Tyndale]

Tyndale Bible of 1534 [Tyndale]

Summary of Tyndale Bible of 1534 [Tyndale]

The Tyndale Bible generally refers to the body of biblical translations by William Tyndale. Tyndale’s Bible is credited with being the first English translation to work directly from Hebrew and Greek texts. Furthermore it was the first English biblical translation that was mass-produced as a result of new advances in the art of printing. The term Tyndale’s Bible is not strictly correct, because Tyndale never published a complete Bible. Prior to his execution Tyndale had only finished translating the entire New Testament and roughly half of the Old Testament. Of the latter, the Pentateuch, Jonah and a revised version of the book of Genesis were published during his lifetime. His other Old Testament works were first used in the creation of the Matthew Bible and also heavily influenced every major English translation of the Bible that followed.

Tyndale Bible of 1534 [Tyndale]