Abbott, J.S.C. – The Child at Home

THE CHILD AT HOME; OR
THE PRINCIPLES OF FILIAL DUTY
FAMILIARLY ILLUSTRATED.
BY JOHN S. C. ABBOTT,
Author Of “The Mother At Home.”
Published By The American Tract Society
150 Nassau-Street New-York.
Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1833, by CROCKER and
BREWSTER, in the Clerk’s Office of the District Court of Massachusetts.
Right of publishing transferred to American Tract Society.

In this 7 chapter work, Abbott (Congregationalist) looks at responsibility, deception, obedience, religious truth, piety, and traits of character.




Buy me Burrito!
Burritos are delicious. Meat, beans, sour cream, veggies, wrapped in a tortilla. We all enjoy burritos! But you know that you cannot have what is good without somebody paying for it. If you have enjoyed things on my website, please consider helping me maintain the expenses of this site. Consider at least a one time donation to this ministry of $10 or $20 dollars? Very infrequently (one person every 3-6 months) will somebody donate something. Usually that is all I receive from 34 websites! Yet, from my download statistics, I have about 96 gigabytes total being downloaded monthly from all of these websites. Be a blessing to me and donate any amount. It would be really great if you could gift me and my wife (who splits a burrito?) this money so that we could enjoy eating out at least once in a while. (I pay the expenses for these sites out of our living expenses.) God will richly bless you and repay you for your generosity. 1 Timothy 5:18 For the scripture saith, Thou shalt not muzzle the ox that treadeth out the corn. And, The labourer is worthy of his reward. If you received some value from my websites, consider at least a small donation. A big donation would really be nice, too, though.
Donate to David Cox Ministries.

PREFACE.

This book is intended for the children of those families to which The Mother at Home has gone. It is prepared with the hope that it may exert an influence upon the minds of the children, in exciting gratitude for their parents’ love, and in forming characters which shall ensure future usefulness and happiness.

The book is intended, not for entertainment, but for solid instruction. I have endeavored, however, to present instruction in an attractive form, but with what success, the result alone can tell. The object of the book will not be accomplished by a careless perusal. It should be read by the child, in the presence of the parent, that the parent may seize upon the incidents and remarks introduced, and thus deepen the impression.

Though the book is particularly intended for children, or rather for young persons, it is hoped that it will aid parents in their efforts for moral and religious instruction.

It goes from the author with the most earnest prayer, that it may save some parents from blighted hopes, and that it may allure many children to gratitude, and obedience, and heaven.
JOHN S. C. ABBOTT
Worcester December, 1833.




TABLE OF CONTENTS.

Chapter I. RESPONSIBILITY.

The Police Court. The widow and her daughter. Effect of a child’s conduct upon the happiness of its parents. The young sailor. The condemned pirate visited by his parents. Consequences of disobedience. A mother’s grave. The sick child. . .7

Chapter II. DECEPTION.

George Washington and his hatchet.—Consequences of deception. Temptations to deceive. Story of the child sent on an errand. Detection. Anecdote. The dying child. Peace of a dying hour disturbed by falsehood previously uttered. Various ways of deceiving. Thoughts on death. Disclosures of the judgment day. . .28

Chapter III. OBEDIENCE.

Firmness requisite in doing duty. The irresolute boy. The girl and the green apples. Temptations. Evening party. Important consequences resulting from slight disobedience. The state prison. History of a young convict. Ingratitude of disobedience. The soldier’s widow and her son. Story of Casabianca. Cheerful obedience. Illustration. Parental kindness. . .46

Chapter IV. OBEDIENCE, continued.

The moonlight game. Reasons why good parents will not allow their children to play in the streets in the evening. The evening walk. The terrified girl, Instance of filial affection. Anecdote. Strength of a mother’s love. The child’s entire dependence. A child rescued from danger. Child lost in the prairie.. .71

Chapter V. RELIGIOUS TRUTH.

Human character. The Northern Voyagers. Imaginary scene in a court of justice. Love of God. Scene from Shakspeare. Efforts to save us. The protection of angels. The evening party. The dissolute son. A child lost in the woods. The sufferings of the Savior. The Holy Spirit. . .94

Chapter VI. PIETY.

Penitence. Charles Bullard. His good character in school. In college. The pious boy. The orchard. The fishing-rod. The forgiving spirit. How children may do good. The English clergyman and the child who gave himself to the Savior. The happy sick boy. The Christian child in heaven. Uncertainty of life. The loaded gun. The boy in the stage-coach. . .119

Chapter VII. TRAITS OF CHARACTER.

We cannot be happy without friends. Why scholars are unpopular in school. The way to gain friends. The warm fire. Playing ball. Recipe for children who would be loved. A bad temper. Amiable disposition to be cultivated. The angry man. Humility. The vain young lady. Vanity always ridiculous. The affected school girl. The unaffected schoolgirl. Story of the proud girl. Moral courage. The duellist. The three school-boys. George persuaded to throw the snow-ball. What would have been real moral courage. The boy leaving home, His mother’s provisions for his comfort. The parting. His father’s counsel. His reflections in the stage-coach. He consecrates himself to his Maker. . .347




Abbott-child-at-home Bok
abbott-child-at-home.bok_.mybible
701.4 KB
90 Downloads
Details

In this 7 chapter work, Abbott (Congregationalist) looks at responsibility, deception, obedience, religious truth, piety, and traits of character.

Author:Abbott
Platforms:Windows 8
Category:Mysw-bok-a
License:Freeware
Date:September 9, 2019


fam50 The Christian as a Worker
examines work, work ethics, and what the Bible commands Christians concerning work.
Excerpt: Since the creation of the human being, God has given men work to do. Even in the garden, their principal work was to dress and keep (guard) the garden, their source of food. So, God wants man to be occupied (to always work). There is a saying that “idle hands are the devil's workshop.” It is certain that people do not know how to handle prosperity. Just look at the sins people get into in their retirement. In God’s eyes, they dedicate their lives at that point to things without eternal value. God knows that if man focuses on surviving, on sustaining himself and family, etc. that he is less inclined to sin and get into idle vices. Psalms 128:2 For thou shalt eat the labor of thine hands: happy shalt thou be, and it shall be well with thee. There is nothing better than working hard and enjoying the fruit of your labors.
Read the Tract fam50 The Christian as a Worker.

Exit mobile version